Mafia mansions: Real-life gangster homes and hideouts

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Infamous estates of major mobsters

Motley Fool Issues Rare "Home Run Buy" Alert Slide 1 of 51: Built from seriously ill-gotten gains, the most infamous kingpin cribs are, as you might expect, suitably OTT and dripping with luxury. From Al Capone's Miami bolthole to Vincent Palermo's Houston hideaway, we take you on a tour around 10 mobster homes and hideouts.
Built from seriously ill-gotten gains, the most infamous kingpin cribs are, as you might expect, suitably OTT and dripping with luxury. From Al Capone's Miami bolthole to Vincent Palermo's Houston hideaway, click ahead as we take you on a tour around 10 mobster homes and hideouts.

Al Capone's Miami mansion

Slide 5 of 51: Capone was released from Alcatraz in 1939. Seriously ill with late-stage syphilis, he spent the last years of his life with his devoted wife Mae at the Miami mansion, where he died in 1947. Slide 2 of 51: Al Capone, boss of the Chicago Outfit, otherwise known as the South Side Gang, made most of his money bootlegging booze. Based in the Windy City, Capone had a habit of leaving town to avoid both his enemies and the cops, and at the height of his power in 1928, he bought a spectacular villa on Palm Island, in Miami's South Beach.
Al Capone, boss of the Chicago Outfit, otherwise known as the South Side Gang, made most of his money bootlegging booze. Based in the Windy City, Capone had a habit of leaving town to avoid both his enemies and the cops, and at the height of his power in 1928, he bought a spectacular villa on Palm Island, in Miami's South Beach.

Al Capone's Miami mansion

Slide 6 of 51: Mae Capone eventually sold the four-bedroom property in 1952. It was on the market last year with an asking price of $14.9 million (£11.3m) after undergoing extensive renovations by MB America. The mansion retains some of its original Art Deco features, including a swish powder room and tiled fireplaces. Slide 3 of 51: Capone paid $40,000 (£30k) for the 30,000-square-foot estate, around $589,000 (£446k) in today's money. The security-conscious hoodlum reportedly spent $200,000 (£151k) on added security extras, which is about $2.9 million (£2.2m) when adjusted for inflation. These included the installation of a seven-foot-high wall complete with searchlights, as well as a gatehouse, cabana and grotto.
Capone paid $40,000 for the 30,000-square-foot estate, around $589,000 in today's money. The security-conscious hoodlum reportedly spent $200,000 on added security extras, which is about $2.9 million when adjusted for inflation. These included the installation of a seven-foot-high wall complete with searchlights, as well as a gatehouse, cabana and grotto.

Al Capone's Miami mansion

Slide 7 of 51: Unlike his rival Capone, gangster George “Bugs” Moran preferred to live in a luxury hotel. Though his parents were French immigrants, the mobster, who was born Adelard Cunin, headed the mostly Irish-American North Side Gang, which battled against Capone's Italian-American South Side Gang for control of Chicago's illegal alcohol trade. Slide 4 of 51: The gangster was at his Miami retreat when the Saint Valentine's Day Massacre occurred on 14 February 1929, which took out five members of arch-rival Bugs Moran's gang and two affiliate members. A few months later in May of the same year, Capone was imprisoned for nine months in Philadelphia for carrying a concealed weapon, then jailed again for seven years in 1931 over tax evasion charges.
The gangster was at his Miami retreat when the Saint Valentine's Day Massacre occurred on 14 February 1929, which took out five members of arch-rival Bugs Moran's gang and two affiliate members. A few months later in May of the same year, Capone was imprisoned for nine months in Philadelphia for carrying a concealed weapon, then jailed again for seven years in 1931 over tax evasion charges.

Al Capone's Miami mansion

Slide 8 of 51: During the 1920s and 1930s, Moran resided at Chicago's opulent Parkway Hotel. The Art Deco building was conveniently located less than a block away from the North Side garage, where the gang stored the bulk of its illicit booze. The site was later the scene of the Saint Valentine's Day Massacre.
Capone was released from Alcatraz in 1939. Seriously ill with late-stage syphilis, he spent the last years of his life with his devoted wife Mae at the Miami mansion, where he died in 1947.

Al Capone's Miami mansion

Slide 9 of 51: Moran wasn't the only North Side Gang member who lived at the hotel. Henry Gusenberg and optician-turned-criminal Reinhardt Schwimmer also resided there. Gusenberg, along with Moran, narrowly avoided being gunned down in the Saint Valentine's Day Massacre. Schwimmer, on the other hand, wasn't quite so lucky and was among the seven victims.
Mae Capone eventually sold the four-bedroom property in 1952. It was on the market last year with an asking price of $14.9 million after undergoing extensive renovations by MB America. The mansion retains some of its original Art Deco features, including a swish powder room and tiled fireplaces.

Bugs Moran's Chicago hotel suite

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Unlike his rival Capone, gangster George “Bugs” Moran preferred to live in a luxury hotel. Though his parents were French immigrants, the mobster, who was born Adelard Cunin, headed the mostly Irish-American North Side Gang, which battled against Capone's Italian-American South Side Gang for control of Chicago's illegal alcohol trade.

Bugs Moran's Chicago hotel suite

Slide 10 of 51: Following the massacre, Moran lost much of his power and influence in Chicago, and the ending of Prohibition in 1933 coupled with the Great Depression pretty much finished him off. The mobster continued to reside at the Parkway before leaving Chicago in the mid-1930s. He was locked up in 1939 and spent much of his remaining life in prison, where he died in 1957.
During the 1920s and 1930s, Moran resided at Chicago's opulent Parkway Hotel. The Art Deco building was conveniently located less than a block away from the North Side garage, where the gang stored the bulk of its illicit booze. The site was later the scene of the Saint Valentine's Day Massacre.

Bugs Moran's Chicago hotel suite

Slide 11 of 51: The luxurious hotel, which once housed a grand ballroom, high-end restaurant and of course the requisite speakeasy, has since been converted into the Pierre, a luxury condo development. Fortunately, the conversion was carried out sensitively, and the building still retains its Art Deco splendor.
Moran wasn't the only North Side Gang member who lived at the hotel. Henry Gusenberg and optician-turned-criminal Reinhardt Schwimmer also resided there. Gusenberg, along with Moran, narrowly avoided being gunned down in the Saint Valentine's Day Massacre. Schwimmer, on the other hand, wasn't quite so lucky and was among the seven victims.

Bugs Moran's Chicago hotel suite

Slide 12 of 51: Benjamin "Bugsy" Siegel had a fearsome reputation and was one of the founders of Murder, Inc., which acted as the enforcement arm of the Jewish mob and Italian-American Mafia during the 1930s and 1940s. Like Al Capone and Bugs Moran, Siegel was a bootlegger during the Prohibition era. He then got into gambling, moving to California in the late 1930s where he built a large mansion.
Following the massacre, Moran lost much of his power and influence in Chicago, and the ending of Prohibition in 1933 coupled with the Great Depression pretty much finished him off. The mobster continued to reside at the Parkway before leaving Chicago in the mid-1930s. He was locked up in 1939 and spent much of his remaining life in prison, where he died in 1957.

Bugs Moran's Chicago hotel suite

Slide 13 of 51: Siegel's LA bolthole in the city's Holmby Hills was constructed in 1938 with the proceeds of his many crimes. Sitting on a total of 1.8 acres, the house has five bedrooms, an enormous living room, oak-paneled library, imposing dining room, and a spacious home cinema.
The luxurious hotel, which once housed a grand ballroom, high-end restaurant and of course the requisite speakeasy, has since been converted into the Pierre, a luxury condo development. Fortunately, the conversion was carried out sensitively, and the building still retains its Art Deco splendor.

Bugsy Siegel's LA bolthole

Slide 14 of 51: Siegel resided at the property with his wife and children. No expense was spared and the house was decked out with every mod con and luxury imaginable. The principal lounge room had 18-foot carved divan sofas and an ornate bar stocked with the most exquisite champagnes, cognacs and whiskeys.
Benjamin "Bugsy" Siegel had a fearsome reputation and was one of the founders of Murder, Inc., which acted as the enforcement arm of the Jewish mob and Italian-American Mafia during the 1930s and 1940s. Like Al Capone and Bugs Moran, Siegel was a bootlegger during the Prohibition era. He then got into gambling, moving to California in the late 1930s where he built a large mansion.

Bugsy Siegel's LA bolthole

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Siegel's LA bolthole in the city's Holmby Hills was constructed in 1938 with the proceeds of his many crimes. Sitting on a total of 1.8 acres, the house has five bedrooms, an enormous living room, oak-paneled library, imposing dining room, and a spacious home cinema.

Bugsy Siegel's LA bolthole

Slide 15 of 51: A rarity at a time when even the most extravagant homes had only one or two bathrooms at most, the house wowed with six vanity rooms. The dining room was outfitted with a vast wood table that seated a whopping 30 – significantly bigger than the polished wooden table shown here. 
Siegel resided at the property with his wife and children. No expense was spared and the house was decked out with every mod con and luxury imaginable. The principal lounge room had 18-foot carved divan sofas and an ornate bar stocked with the most exquisite champagnes, cognacs and whiskeys.

Bugsy Siegel's LA bolthole

Slide 16 of 51: The grounds are equally lavish, featuring a pool and manicured gardens. The wardrobe in the master bedroom contained a secret trap door to the attic, which Siegel escaped through in 1940 to evade the cops, who saw through the ruse and arrested him for murder. Siegel was acquitted for the crime, but met his end in 1947 when he was shot dead at his girlfriend's home in Beverly Hills. 

Take a look at these 25 curious homes with secret rooms hidden inside.
A rarity at a time when even the most extravagant homes had only one or two bathrooms at most, the house wowed with six vanity rooms. The dining room was outfitted with a vast wood table that seated a whopping 30 – significantly bigger than the polished wooden table shown here. 

Bugsy Siegel's LA bolthole

Slide 17 of 51: The "Lord High Executioner” of the terrifying Murder, Inc., and the boss of what would become the Gambino crime family, Albert Anastasia was as ruthless as they come. The psychopathic Mafia leader is thought to have masterminded the murders of hundreds of people, making him one of the most notorious criminals in history. He bought this Spanish-style New Jersey property in 1947.
The grounds are equally lavish, featuring a pool and manicured gardens. The wardrobe in the master bedroom contained a secret trap door to the attic, which Siegel escaped through in 1940 to evade the cops, who saw through the ruse and arrested him for murder. Siegel was acquitted for the crime, but met his end in 1947 when he was shot dead at his girlfriend's home in Beverly Hills.  Take a look at these 25 curious homes with secret rooms hidden inside.

Albert Anastasia's New Jersey base

Slide 18 of 51: The menacing Mafia Don controlled his organization's criminal activities from the mansion and is alleged to have tortured and killed people in the house. The Fort Lee home, which is located across the Hudson River from New York's Manhattan, has a total of 25 sprawling rooms and sits on 1.3 acres.
The "Lord High Executioner” of the terrifying Murder, Inc., and the boss of what would become the Gambino crime family, Albert Anastasia was as ruthless as they come. The psychopathic Mafia leader is thought to have masterminded the murders of hundreds of people, making him one of the most notorious criminals in history. He bought this Spanish-style New Jersey property in 1947.

Albert Anastasia's New Jersey base

Slide 19 of 51: The house is surrounded by high walls that were once covered in barbed wire and guarded by two vicious Dobermanns. Along with several reception rooms, the mansion has a number of capacious bedrooms, a retro kitchen and a glass-covered conservatory offering views of the New York skyline.
The menacing Mafia Don controlled his organization's criminal activities from the mansion and is alleged to have tortured and killed people in the house. The Fort Lee home, which is located across the Hudson River from New York's Manhattan, has a total of 25 sprawling rooms and sits on 1.3 acres.

Albert Anastasia's New Jersey base

Slide 20 of 51: Looking at this picture of the property's wood-paneled office, it's not hard to imagine the scary Mafia boss sitting behind the desk with a cigar in his hand, planning his next kill or directing his minions to execute it on his behalf. But the office is by no means the eeriest room in the house, not by a long shot. That would be the Jacuzzi room...
The house is surrounded by high walls that were once covered in barbed wire and guarded by two vicious Dobermanns. Along with several reception rooms, the mansion has a number of capacious bedrooms, a retro kitchen and a glass-covered conservatory offering views of the New York skyline.

Albert Anastasia's New Jersey base

Slide 21 of 51: Known in Anastasia's time as “the slaughter room”, it contained nothing apart from a drain, into which the blood of his unfortunate victims would flow. Anastasia's reign of terror continued until 1957 when he was gunned down while having a shave in the barber shop at Manhattan's Park Sheraton Hotel. His mansion was offloaded and passed though various owners, before selling in 2017 for $6.9 million (£5.2m).
Looking at this picture of the property's wood-paneled office, it's not hard to imagine the scary Mafia boss sitting behind the desk with a cigar in his hand, planning his next kill or directing his minions to execute it on his behalf. But the office is by no means the eeriest room in the house, not by a long shot. That would be the Jacuzzi room...

Albert Anastasia's New Jersey base

Slide 22 of 51: Pete Corrado, who was dubbed “Machine Gun Pete”, was one of the first members of the Detroit Outfit or Detroit Partnership, the Midwestern city's most active Mafia organization. He headed the Corrado clan offshoot from 1931 until his death from a heart attack in 1957. The Mafioso lived in a 7,481-square-foot mansion at 701 Middlesex Road in Grosse Pointe Park, just outside Detroit.
Known in Anastasia's time as “the slaughter room”, it contained nothing apart from a drain, into which the blood of his unfortunate victims would flow. Anastasia's reign of terror continued until 1957 when he was gunned down while having a shave in the barber shop at Manhattan's Park Sheraton Hotel. His mansion was offloaded and passed though various owners, before selling in 2017 for $6.9 million.

Pete Corrado's Michigan manor

Slide 23 of 51: Corrado made his money organizing and operating an illegal numbers racket or so-called “Italian lottery”. He also had interests in real estate and lucrative cuts in a number of profitable businesses. His Georgian-Colonial mansion was paid for with the proceeds of these activities.
Pete Corrado, who was dubbed “Machine Gun Pete”, was one of the first members of the Detroit Outfit or Detroit Partnership, the Midwestern city's most active Mafia organization. He headed the Corrado clan offshoot from 1931 until his death from a heart attack in 1957. The Mafioso lived in a 7,481-square-foot mansion at 701 Middlesex Road in Grosse Pointe Park, just outside Detroit.

Pete Corrado's Michigan palazzo

Slide 24 of 51: Decorated in a classic 1950s style, the Mafioso mansion has a decorative tiled entrance hall adorned with a pretty fountain. Aside from the numerous receptions rooms and bedrooms, other highlights of the substantial suburban property include three bars, a wine cellar, spa and pool room, as well as a bomb-proof garage.
Corrado made his money organizing and operating an illegal numbers racket or so-called “Italian lottery”. He also had interests in real estate and lucrative cuts in a number of profitable businesses. His Georgian-Colonial mansion was paid for with the proceeds of these activities.

Pete Corrado's Michigan palazzo

Slide 25 of 51: Given that this was a mob home, the property has several hidden spaces that were presumably used to hide Corrado's machine guns and other weapons. Adding to the Mafia allure, a series of tunnels run under the house, one of which connects to a mansion across the road that was once owned by Detroit Outfit boss Anthony Zerilli.

Love this? Check out these real homes with secret tunnels inside.
Decorated in a classic 1950s style, the Mafioso mansion has a decorative tiled entrance hall adorned with a pretty fountain. Aside from the numerous receptions rooms and bedrooms, other highlights of the substantial suburban property include three bars, a wine cellar, spa and pool room, as well as a bomb-proof garage.

Pete Corrado's Michigan manor

Slide 26 of 51: Following Corrado's death in 1957, the house stayed in the family and became the home of fellow gang member Anthony "The Bull" Corrado until 1988. It was eventually purchased by Detroit Tigers baseball star-turned-commentator Kirk Gibson in 1997 for $665,000 (£505k). He sold the property via auction in 2015 for $715,000 (£543k).
Given that this was a mob home, the property has several hidden spaces that were presumably used to hide Corrado's machine guns and other weapons. Adding to the Mafia allure, a series of tunnels run under the house, one of which connects to a mansion across the road that was once owned by Detroit Outfit boss Anthony Zerilli. Love this? Check out these real homes with secret tunnels inside.

Pete Corrado's Michigan manor

Slide 27 of 51: The brains behind the Chicago Outfit for a good 40 years, Paul “The Waiter” Ricca was Al Capone's de facto successor and operated in the Windy City from the 1930s to the early 1970s. He lived with his family in this fine five-bedroom house in the Chicago suburb of River Forest from 1938 to 1957.
Following Corrado's death in 1957, the house stayed in the family and became the home of fellow gang member Anthony "The Bull" Corrado until 1988. It was eventually purchased by Detroit Tigers baseball star-turned-commentator Kirk Gibson in 1997 for $665,000. He sold the property via auction in 2015 for $715,000.

Paul Ricca's Chicago hideaway

Slide 28 of 51: Ricca served as underboss to Frank "The Enforcer” Nitti, but in reality, he called the shots. Nitti, who suffered from extreme claustrophobia, committed suicide in 1943 after he was pressured by Ricca and others to plead guilty to extortion charges to get them off the hook. Ricca then took over as leader of the Chicago Outfit and appointed Tony Accardo as underboss.
The brains behind the Chicago Outfit for a good 40 years, Paul “The Waiter” Ricca was Al Capone's de facto successor and operated in the Windy City from the 1930s to the early 1970s. He lived with his family in this fine five-bedroom house in the Chicago suburb of River Forest from 1938 to 1957.

Paul Ricca's Chicago hideaway

Slide 29 of 51: Like his suburban mansion, Paul Ricca commanded a veneer of responsibility, but nonetheless, he was just as cruel and ruthless as the other Mafia bosses. If he wanted to get rid of someone, he would simply whisper “make-a him go away” to one of his enforcers and consider the job done.
Ricca served as underboss to Frank "The Enforcer” Nitti, but in reality, he called the shots. Nitti, who suffered from extreme claustrophobia, committed suicide in 1943 after he was pressured by Ricca and others to plead guilty to extortion charges to get them off the hook. Ricca then took over as leader of the Chicago Outfit and appointed Tony Accardo as underboss.

Paul Ricca's Chicago hideaway

Slide 30 of 51: After a day's work enforcing his iron rule, Ricca would return to his well-appointed home with its four fireplaces, parquet floors, handsome library and other splendid rooms. Like other Mafia mansions, the property has plenty of places to hide incriminating items, including a wardrobe with a secret door that opens to a concealed space.
Like his suburban mansion, Paul Ricca commanded a veneer of responsibility, but nonetheless, he was just as cruel and ruthless as the other Mafia bosses. If he wanted to get rid of someone, he would simply whisper “make-a him go away” to one of his enforcers and consider the job done.

Paul Ricca's Chicago hideaway

Slide 31 of 51: Ricca was arrested in 1957 and subsequently charged with tax evasion. He was imprisoned in 1959 but only served 27 months of his nine-year sentence. When Ricca died of a heart attack in 1972, his former mansion passed to a professor at the University of Illinois who sold it in 2014 for $900,000 (£683k) through Berg Properties.
After a day's work enforcing his iron rule, Ricca would return to his well-appointed home with its four fireplaces, parquet floors, handsome library and other splendid rooms. Like other Mafia mansions, the property has plenty of places to hide incriminating items, including a wardrobe with a secret door that opens to a concealed space.

Paul Ricca's Chicago hideaway

Slide 32 of 51: Tony Accardo, AKA “Big Tuna”, allegedly took over from Paul Ricca in 1972 as the boss of the Chicago Outfit, having worked his way up from a small-time crook on Chicago's South Side. Like his predecessor, Accardo ended up purchasing a magnificent mansion in the Chicago suburb of River Forest. 
Ricca was arrested in 1957 and subsequently charged with tax evasion. He was imprisoned in 1959 but only served 27 months of his nine-year sentence. When Ricca died of a heart attack in 1972, his former mansion passed to a professor at the University of Illinois who sold it in 2014 for $900,000 through Berg Properties.

Tony Accardo's River Forest residence

Slide 33 of 51: Accardo lived in the Colonial-style five-bedroom house on Ashland Avenue from 1964 when he was the underboss of the Chicago Outfit, through to 1972 when he was the Don of the organization. It was built in 1963 at a cost of up to $160,000 (£121k), which is around $1.3 million (£1m) in today's money.
Tony Accardo, AKA “Big Tuna”, allegedly took over from Paul Ricca in 1972 as the boss of the Chicago Outfit, having worked his way up from a small-time crook on Chicago's South Side. Like his predecessor, Accardo ended up purchasing a magnificent mansion in the Chicago suburb of River Forest. 

Tony Accardo's River Forest residence

Slide 34 of 51: Rocking stunning parquet flooring, intricate plasterwork and high-end brick fireplaces, the house has all the trappings of a Mafia leader's residence. Aside from several posh reception rooms and bedrooms, the property has a library, cedar-lined spa, large three-car garage and swimming pool.
Accardo lived in the Colonial-style five-bedroom house on Ashland Avenue from 1964 when he was the underboss of the Chicago Outfit, through to 1972 when he was the Don of the organization. It was built in 1963 at a cost of up to $160,000, which is around $1.3 million in today's money.

Tony Accardo's River Forest residence

Slide 35 of 51: The mansion hit the headlines for all the wrong reasons in 1978 after it was burgled. Accardo was on holiday in California at the time. Not long after, the three alleged thieves and four associates were found strangled with their throats cut. Accardo was suspected to have ordered the murders and the allegation was confirmed in 2002 by mobster-turned-informant Nicholas Calabrese.
Rocking stunning parquet flooring, intricate plasterwork and high-end brick fireplaces, the house has all the trappings of a Mafia leader's residence. Aside from several posh reception rooms and bedrooms, the property has a library, cedar-lined spa, large three-car garage and swimming pool.

Tony Accardo's River Forest residence

Slide 36 of 51: Following the burglary, Accardo sold the property and decamped to a condo in the same neighborhood, before moving into his daughter and son-in-law's home in Barrington Hills, Illinois. He died of respiratory and heart failure in 1992. As for the River Forest house, it is currently on the market via Caporale Realty Group, priced at just under $1.5 million (£1.2m).

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The mansion hit the headlines for all the wrong reasons in 1978 after it was burgled. Accardo was on holiday in California at the time. Not long after, the three alleged thieves and four associates were found strangled with their throats cut. Accardo was suspected to have ordered the murders and the allegation was confirmed in 2002 by mobster-turned-informant Nicholas Calabrese.

Tony Accardo's River Forest residence

Slide 37 of 51: Vito Rizzuto, “Montreal's Teflon Don”, was the alleged boss of the Sicilian Mafia in Canada and head of the widely feared Rizzuto crime family – the subject of Netflix's Bad Blood series. While Rizzuto is reputed to have been involved with the Mafia since the 1960s, he managed to evade jail until 2004. Prior to this, Rizzuto lived with his family in a mansion in Montreal's Ahuntsic-Cartierville borough.
Following the burglary, Accardo sold the property and decamped to a condo in the same neighborhood, before moving into his daughter and son-in-law's home in Barrington Hills, Illinois. He died of respiratory and heart failure in 1992. As for the River Forest house, it is currently on the market via Caporale Realty Group, priced at just under $1.5 million. Love this? Check out America's biggest mansions for some serious real estate.

Vito Rizzuto's Montreal mansion

Slide 38 of 51: The Tudor-style five-bedroom house is situated on the posh neighborhood's leafy Antoine Berthelet Avenue, which is nicknamed “Mafia Row” by locals. At least four alleged Mafiosos have owned homes on the thoroughfare, including Rizzuto's brother-in-law, Paulo Renda.
Vito Rizzuto, “Montreal's Teflon Don”, was the alleged boss of the Sicilian Mafia in Canada and head of the widely feared Rizzuto crime family – the subject of Netflix's Bad Blood series. While Rizzuto is reputed to have been involved with the Mafia since the 1960s, he managed to evade jail until 2004. Prior to this, Rizzuto lived with his family in a mansion in Montreal's Ahuntsic-Cartierville borough.

Vito Rizzuto's Montreal mansion

Slide 39 of 51: Needless to say, like all good Mafia-connected homes, the sizeable estate has plenty of high-end touches, including numerous luxury chandeliers, quality parquet flooring, sumptuous Persian carpets, antique furniture, and a sweeping staircase in the entrance hall.
The Tudor-style five-bedroom house is situated on the posh neighborhood's leafy Antoine Berthelet Avenue, which is nicknamed “Mafia Row” by locals. At least four alleged Mafiosos have owned homes on the thoroughfare, including Rizzuto's brother-in-law, Paulo Renda.

Vito Rizzuto's Montreal mansion

Slide 40 of 51: Other selling points include a palatial family room, en-suite bathrooms for each of the house's five bedrooms, two powder rooms, and a state-of-the-art kitchen in tip-top condition with solid mahogany cabinets. The Rizzuto family obviously insisted on the best when it came to kitting out their home.
Needless to say, like all good Mafia-connected homes, the sizeable estate has plenty of high-end touches, including numerous luxury chandeliers, quality parquet flooring, sumptuous Persian carpets, antique furniture, and a sweeping staircase in the entrance hall.

Vito Rizzuto's Montreal mansion

Slide 41 of 51: Rizzuto was released from jail in 2012, and a power struggle for control of the crime family's operations ensued, resulting in several high-profile murders. The big boss passed away in 2013 from complications related to his lung cancer and the house sold that same year for around $1.1 million (£858k).
Other selling points include a palatial family room, en-suite bathrooms for each of the house's five bedrooms, two powder rooms, and a state-of-the-art kitchen in tip-top condition with solid mahogany cabinets. The Rizzuto family obviously insisted on the best when it came to kitting out their home.

Vito Rizzuto's Montreal mansion

Slide 42 of 51: Part of New York's Gambino crime family, Carmine "The Bull" Agnello married the Don's daughter Victoria Gotti in 1984. The couple moved into a five-bedroom mansion in the Long Island village of Westbury, New York in 1989, where they lived with their three sons Carmine Jr., John and Frank.
Rizzuto was released from jail in 2012, and a power struggle for control of the crime family's operations ensued, resulting in several high-profile murders. The big boss passed away in 2013 from complications related to his lung cancer and the house sold that same year for around $1.1 million.

Carmine Agnello's Long Island estate

Slide 43 of 51: Agnello's criminal activities eventually caught up with him, and he was sentenced in 2001 to nine years in prison for racketeering and arson. While he was in jail, his wife Victoria divorced him on grounds of constructive abandonment and was awarded the house. Together with her sons, Victoria went on to star in reality shows Growing up Gotti and Growing Up Gotti: Ten Years Later.
Part of New York's Gambino crime family, Carmine "The Bull" Agnello married the Don's daughter Victoria Gotti in 1984. The couple moved into a five-bedroom mansion in the Long Island village of Westbury, New York in 1989, where they lived with their three sons Carmine Jr., John and Frank.

Carmine Agnello's Long Island estate

Slide 44 of 51: The mansion featured prominently in the shows and Gotti has gone on to become a best-selling author, columnist and reality star. She has described the home as “very warm, very woodsy, very comfortable yet very elegant”. As you can see, this opulent living room is covered in fine wood paneling and lined with bookshelves.
Agnello's criminal activities eventually caught up with him, and he was sentenced in 2001 to nine years in prison for racketeering and arson. While he was in jail, his wife Victoria divorced him on grounds of constructive abandonment and was awarded the house. Together with her sons, Victoria went on to star in reality shows Growing up Gotti and Growing Up Gotti: Ten Years Later.

Carmine Agnello's Long Island estate

Slide 45 of 51: The bedrooms are just as luxurious, featuring ornate pillars and four-poster beds. Despite this, Gotti has made several attempts to sell the property. In 2008, it was listed for a pricey $3.5 million (£2.6m). The following year, the house was threatened with foreclosure when Gotti fell into arrears with her mortgage repayments. Since then it has been listed and taken off the market seven times.
The mansion featured prominently in the shows and Gotti has gone on to become a best-selling author, columnist and reality star. She has described the home as “very warm, very woodsy, very comfortable yet very elegant”. As you can see, this opulent living room is covered in fine wood paneling and lined with bookshelves.

Carmine Agnello's Long Island estate

Slide 46 of 51: It seems nobody is willing to pay Gotti's ambitious asking price. The mansion was in the news again in 2016 when it was raided by the FBI in relation to a tax fraud investigation surrounding Gotti's sons, Carmine Jr., John and Frank, but no charges were brought. However, Carmine Jr. was recently busted for operating an illegal scrap metal yard.
The bedrooms are just as luxurious, featuring ornate pillars and four-poster beds. Despite this, Gotti has made several attempts to sell the property. In 2008, it was listed for a pricey $3.5 million. The following year, the house was threatened with foreclosure when Gotti fell into arrears with her mortgage repayments. Since then it has been listed and taken off the market seven times.

Carmine Agnello's Long Island estate

Slide 47 of 51: Mobster-turned-FBI-informant Vincent Palermo, AKA Vinny Ocean, was the de facto boss of New Jersey's DeCavalcante crime family, inspiring the character of Tony Soprano in the award-winning HBO series. After grassing up his associates, Palermo was placed in the Witness Protection Program and snapped up a gated mansion in Houston under the pseudonym Vincent Cabella in 2003.
It seems nobody is willing to pay Gotti's ambitious asking price. The mansion was in the news again in 2016 when it was raided by the FBI in relation to a tax fraud investigation surrounding Gotti's sons, Carmine Jr., John and Frank, but no charges were brought. However, Carmine Jr. was recently busted for operating an illegal scrap metal yard.

Vincent Palermo's Houston hideout

Slide 48 of 51: A veritable palace, the five-bedroom cabana property on Memorial Drive is fantastically ritzy. Surrounded by lush gardens, which boast a fancy fountain and pool, the mansion impresses with a plethora of luxurious features, from marble flooring and columns to elaborate plasterwork.
Mobster-turned-FBI-informant Vincent Palermo, AKA Vinny Ocean, was the de facto boss of New Jersey's DeCavalcante crime family, inspiring the character of Tony Soprano in the award-winning HBO series. After grassing up his associates, Palermo was placed in the Witness Protection Program and snapped up a gated mansion in Houston under the pseudonym Vincent Cabella in 2003.

Vincent Palermo's Houston hideout

Slide 49 of 51: Talk about furnishings fit for a billionaire, Palermo didn't hold back when it came to decorating his Houston hideaway. The main open-plan reception room boasts crystal chandeliers, expensive antique and reproduction furniture, Murano glass mirrors, plush carpets, and an absolutely fabulous grand piano. 
A veritable palace, the five-bedroom cabana property on Memorial Drive is fantastically ritzy. Surrounded by lush gardens, which boast a fancy fountain and pool, the mansion impresses with a plethora of luxurious features, from marble flooring and columns to elaborate plasterwork.

Vincent Palermo's Houston hideout

Slide 50 of 51: The ostentatious vibe carries through into the bedrooms. The master suite is graced with a solid mahogany four-poster bed, ornate chandelier and marble fireplace. The majestic house even features a lavish home cinema – perfect for watching all those Sopranos reruns.
Talk about furnishings fit for a billionaire, Palermo didn't hold back when it came to decorating his Houston hideaway. The main open-plan reception room boasts crystal chandeliers, expensive antique and reproduction furniture, Murano glass mirrors, plush carpets, and an absolutely fabulous grand piano. 

Vincent Palermo's Houston hideout

Slide 51 of 51: Palermo's cover was blown in 2009 when the Daily News ran an exposé of his new life in Houston. Several weeks later, he put the mansion up for sale with an asking price of $4 million (£3m). It failed to sell, so he took it off the market. The property was listed again in 2015 and purchased the following year for $2.9 million ($2.2m). We wonder if the new owners have an inkling of its shady past...

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The ostentatious vibe carries through into the bedrooms. The master suite is graced with a solid mahogany four-poster bed, ornate chandelier and marble fireplace. The majestic house even features a lavish home cinema – perfect for watching all those Sopranos reruns.

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